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Tobacco

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Smoking remains the leading cause of preventable death and disease in the United States, killing more than 480,000 Americans each year. More than 16 million Americans are living with a smoking-related disease. Every day, an estimated 2,100 youth and young adults who have been occasional smokers become daily cigarette smokers. According to the 2014 Surgeon General’s Report, 7,000 chemicals and compounds in tobacco smoke cause immediate and long-term damage, leading to disease and death. The only proven strategy to protect yourself from harm is to never smoke, and if you do smoke or use tobacco products, to quit.

To help combat this epidemic, in 2012, CDC launched the first-ever federally funded national tobacco education campaign. The campaign, Tips From Former Smokers (Tips), profiles real people—not actors—who are living with serious long-term health effects from smoking and secondhand smoke exposure, including stomas, paralysis from stroke, lung removal, heart attack, limb amputations, COPD, asthma, macular degeneration, colorectal cancer, periodontal disease, premature birth and  diabetes complications. Additionally, for the first time, in 2016, the Tips campaign is airing an ad aimed at smokers with anxiety and depression. These compelling stories send a powerful message: Quit smoking now—or better yet, don’t start.

What are goals of the Tips Campaign?

The Tips campaign profiles real people—not actors—who are living with serious long-term health effects from smoking and secondhand smoke exposure, including stomas, paralysis from stroke, lung removal, heart attack, limb amputations, COPD, asthma, macular degeneration, colorectal cancer, periodontal disease, premature birth and  diabetes complications. Additionally, for the first time, in 2016, the Tips campaign is airing an ad highlighting smokers with anxiety and depression. These compelling stories send a powerful message: Quit smoking now—or better yet, don’t start.  

The goals of the 2016 Tips campaign are to:

  • Build public awareness of the immediate health damage caused by smoking and exposure to secondhand smoke.

  • Encourage smokers to quit and make free help available for those who want it, including calling 1-800-QUIT-NOW or visiting CDC.gov/tips.

  • Encourage smokers not to smoke around others and nonsmokers to protect themselves and their families from exposure to secondhand smoke.

More about the 2016 Campaign

The 2016 campaign features new advertisements that show the life-altering effects of smoking and tobacco use.

The ads raise awareness about chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and heart disease. The ads also address dual use (defined as concurrent use of both cigarettes and electronic cigarettes), and smoking among individuals with mental health conditions. Finally, a print ad features a cancer survivor focusing on the benefits of quitting.

The 2016 campaign ads began airing January 25th and will run for 20 consecutive weeks. As with previous years, the 2016 campaign will place ads on television, radio, print (magazines), out-of-home (billboards, bus shelters), and online.  Additional radio, print and out-of-home advertisements will be placed in 28 designated market areas with high smoking prevalence. The campaign also uses social media platforms such as Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube to deliver messages.

Research shows the 2012 Tips campaign was a “best buy” in public health, where the benchmark for a cost-effective health program is $50,000 per year of life saved. Tips spent approximately:

  • $480 per smoker who quit

  • $2,819 per premature death prevented

  • $393 per year of life saved

  • $268 per year of healthy life gained                                                                                                                                                                        

 

 

In, 2015 we celebrate 5 years of Kansas being smoke free and

for more than 50 years the U.S. Surgeon General has been reporting

about the dangers of smoking and tobacco use.

 

For more than fifty years, the Surgeon General has been reporting about the dangers of smoking and tobacco use. The findings have spurred many of us to help smokers quit, clear the air of secondhand smoke, and keep young people from starting in the first place.

 

To reflect on all the work that has been done, and remind us of the road ahead, we have developed and released The Next 50 Years. This video can help you raise awareness and draw attention to the important work that remains to be done in tobacco control. Smoking has been the number-one cause of preventable death and disease in this country for decades.

 

The U.S. Surgeon General also developed a report; The Health Consequences of Smoking – 50 Years of Progress.  Please check it out here:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thomas County utilizes the Surgeon General’s report to guide the work we do in Thomas County.  We are also working on educating Thomas County residents about tobacco.  If you are interested in more information, please call Misty Jimerson at the Thomas County Health Department.

 

What more information on tobacco?  Check out the following links for more information.

 

Tobacco Cessation

Since the first surgeon general's report on smoking and health in 1964, 27 additional reports have concluded that tobacco use is the single most avoidable cause of disease, disability and death in the United States.

 

Smoking harms nearly every organ of the body and causes multiple types of cancer.  Smokeless tobacco (chew) causes cancer in the oral cavity, throat, stomach and beyond.

 

Ready to Quit?

  • Visit the Kansas Tobacco Quit Line - KanQuit! Online.

  • Call 1-800-QUIT-NOW for information, coaching and resources to help you quit tobacco!